The Columns Club tours Grand Central Terminal; Courtesy of the New York Preservation Archive Project

The Columns Club consists of supporters ages 21-40 who donate $75 or more annually and are invited to special tours of historic places, archives, and exhibitions.

The Columns Club is an exciting way to engage a new generation of New Yorkers in the Archive Project’s important mission. Founded in 2014, the Columns Club—consisting of young professionals ages 21-40 who donate $75 or more annually—are invited to behind-the-scenes tours of historic sites and archives throughout New York City. These unique experiences have been created to appeal to the wide-ranging tastes of this multi-faceted group. The inaugural event was an after-hours flashlight tour of the nooks and crannies of the Dyckman Farmhouse Museum, a Dutch Colonial-style structure that is the last remaining farmhouse on the island of Manhattan. The growing troupe of Columnists has taken a private tour of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and a twilight streetcar visit through Brooklyn’s Green-Wood Cemetery, ending with wine, cheese and a look through the archives! The group has also explored one of New York City’s greatest icons, Grand Central Terminal, and one of its most secret gems, the Grand Masonic Lodge.

If you are interested in joining this hearty crew of urban explorers, please donate here or contact us with any questions.

Above: The Columns Club tours Grand Central Terminal; Courtesy of the New York Preservation Archive Project
Historic American Buildings Survey, Cervin Robinson, Photographer May 8, 1962, EAST (SEVENTH AVENUE) FACADE FROM NORTHEAST. - Pennsylvania Station, 370 Seventh Avenue, West Thirty-first, Thirty-first-Thirty-third Streets, New York County, NY; Courtesy of The Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

Remnants of Penn Station: A Walking Tour

Monday, May 22, 2017
7:00 – 8:30 p.m.

Join the Columns Club on a hunt for the physical remnants of the historic Pennsylvania Station, many hidden in plain sight around the present-day transportation hub. 

“Through [Pennsylvania Station] one entered the city like a god…one scuttles in now like a rat” (Vincent Scully, American Architecture and Urbanism). While the myth that the demolition of Pennsylvania Station singlehandedly sparked the modern preservation movement has been largely debunked, the destruction of this architectural masterpiece looms large in the history of preservation and New York City as a whole. Amtrak officially acknowledges only one physical remnant of the old structure, but on this tour, participants will be able to see, touch, and experience well over a dozen remaining structural pieces of the grand McKim, Mead & White station. Weaving in never-before-published photographs of the station’s heyday and demolition, the tour will uncover the (glorious) past, (sordid) present, and (uncertain) future of this transportation hub, including an in-depth exploration of the surrounding buildings outside of the station.

Meeting location shared upon RSVP. 

THIS TOUR IS FOR COLUMNS CLUB MEMBERS ONLY. 
Join today or contact Matthew Coody at [email protected] to see if your membership is up to date.


RVSP HERE
 

Above: Historic American Buildings Survey, Cervin Robinson, Photographer May 8, 1962, EAST (SEVENTH AVENUE) FACADE FROM NORTHEAST. - Pennsylvania Station, 370 Seventh Avenue, West Thirty-first, Thirty-first-Thirty-third Streets, New York County, NY; Courtesy of The Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division